Female Sexual Dysfunction

As a woman, you might be experiencing dissatisfaction with your sex life. You're not alone, as about 43% of women do at some point in their lives. Some of those problems are:

We know that oftentimes, medical issues cause or contributing to sexual problems.

Then again, women's sexual responses are a complex blend of emotions and physical stimuli. Women are greatly affected by the early messages received from family, religion, and culture. From a very young age, women are bombarded with images and ideas of what they should look like and how they should act sexually. Most of these ideas are fictional and have very little bearing on reality, but often have tremendous power over a woman's expectations and self-image. This makes female sexual dysfunction difficult to treat.

To truly enjoy sex, women must free themselves from preconceived ideas about beauty and sex and learn what feels good. If women are willing to explore and experiment, it is likely they will find the kind of sex that feels good both emotionally and physically.

There's so much information out there about women's sexual response, and the medical community is beginning to put it all together. We're looking at a better understanding of the blood vessels and nerves in the pelvis and how surgeries, childbirth, illnesses, medications, hormonal changes, and aging may affect a woman's sexual experience and desire. Research into this area has become more focused in recent years and we are learning more about it every day.

At some point in your life, you may feel that your sex life is not as satisfying as it could be. This may be because you're not getting excited or because when you are sexually excited, you don't become physically aroused or lubricated. Maybe you're not having an orgasm (either you've never had one or you no longer have them). As a woman you may find intercourse difficult, painful, or physically irritating. Sometimes a woman's interest in sex doesn't match up with her partner's or she doesn't feel emotionally close to or trusting of her partner. There can be any number of reasons, physical or psychological (or a combination of the two) why you may feel that you're not having a full and satisfying sex life.

The key to remember is that everyone's sex life is individual and there is no objective standard that every man or woman should meet. If your sex life works for you and your partner, then you should not worry about national averages or what everyone else is doing. If, however, you are concerned that you are suffering from female sexual dysfunction in any way, you might want to consider exploring the causes.

For further information, please visit The Medical Center for Female Sexuality or give us a call at (914) 328-3700 or send us an email at info@centerforfemalesexuality.com.

Female Sexual Dysfunction

As a woman, you might be experiencing dissatisfaction with your sex life. You're not alone, as about 43% of women do at some point in their lives. Some of those problems are:

We know that oftentimes, medical issues cause or contributing to sexual problems.

Then again, women's sexual responses are a complex blend of emotions and physical stimuli. Women are greatly affected by the early messages received from family, religion, and culture. From a very young age, women are bombarded with images and ideas of what they should look like and how they should act sexually. Most of these ideas are fictional and have very little bearing on reality, but often have tremendous power over a woman's expectations and self-image. This makes female sexual dysfunction difficult to treat.

To truly enjoy sex, women must free themselves from preconceived ideas about beauty and sex and learn what feels good. If women are willing to explore and experiment, it is likely they will find the kind of sex that feels good both emotionally and physically.

There's so much information out there about women's sexual response, and the medical community is beginning to put it all together. We're looking at a better understanding of the blood vessels and nerves in the pelvis and how surgeries, childbirth, illnesses, medications, hormonal changes, and aging may affect a woman's sexual experience and desire. Research into this area has become more focused in recent years and we are learning more about it every day.

At some point in your life, you may feel that your sex life is not as satisfying as it could be. This may be because you're not getting excited or because when you are sexually excited, you don't become physically aroused or lubricated. Maybe you're not having an orgasm (either you've never had one or you no longer have them). As a woman you may find intercourse difficult, painful, or physically irritating. Sometimes a woman's interest in sex doesn't match up with her partner's or she doesn't feel emotionally close to or trusting of her partner. There can be any number of reasons, physical or psychological (or a combination of the two) why you may feel that you're not having a full and satisfying sex life.

The key to remember is that everyone's sex life is individual and there is no objective standard that every man or woman should meet. If your sex life works for you and your partner, then you should not worry about national averages or what everyone else is doing. If, however, you are concerned that you are suffering from female sexual dysfunction in any way, you might want to consider exploring the causes.

For further information, please visit The Medical Center for Female Sexuality or give us a call at (914) 328-3700 or send us an email at info@centerforfemalesexuality.com.

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